10 Eating Habits That Are Raising Your Risk of Developing Diabetes



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Your diet may be leading you down a dangerous path

While the leading predictors of diabetes are age, genetics, and family history, an individual’s eating habits may ultimately determine whether he or she develops the disease

There are currently 29 million Americans living with diabetes, an overwhelming majority of those cases being Type 2 diabetes, also known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is most prevalent in adults over the age of 35, but that demographic is starting to change; currently, more than 200,000 Americans under the age of 20 have the disease.

Click here to view the 10 Eating Habits That Are Raising Your Risk of Developing Diabetes

Diabetes occurs when the body’s cells become less responsive to insulin, and as a result, the pancreas strains to produce more of it. Eventually, the pancreas can no longer maintain a healthy level of insulin production, which can lead to a number of adverse, long-term effects such as cardiovascular disease, nerve damage, gum infections, skin infections, and even life-threatening comas.

While the leading predictors of diabetes are age, genetics, and family history, an individual’s eating habits may ultimately determine whether he or she develops the disease. Diets reliant on processed fast food, sugary beverages, refined carbohydrates, and red meat are more likely to rapidly spike blood sugar levels, leading to insulin resistance down the road. No foods need to be eliminated from your diet completely, but swapping in high-fiber, slow-release carbohydrates whenever possible will prevent the body from producing too much insulin.

Here are 10 eating habits that are raising your risk of developing diabetes.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.


How your eating habits can help prevent diabetes

It is widely believed that diabetes can only be caused by excessive sugar intake. However, this is not the only way one can incur it. There are several risk factors that lead to a person becoming a diabetic. Similarly, reducing one’s sugar intake is not the only way to prevent diabetes. While sugar is directly related to diabetes, it is not the only cause.

Striking the right balance is necessary

The foods that are best for someone with diabetes are the same ones that are healthiest for people without it. A mix of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, with an emphasis on whole foods that are minimally processed and rich in nutrients, is ideal. This includes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and fish. Cut down on foods and drinks that are high in sugar or fat, like sweets, fried foods, processed foods and soda.

Experts also recommend reevaluating how you put together a meal. Fill up half your plate with vegetables and salad, a quarter of it with carbohydrates, preferably whole grains, and the last quarter with protein from lean meat, fish, or soy products like tofu.

Personalized diets work best

For most people who are diabetic, the common assumption is that sugar/rice/potato is off limits. But that is not always true. In fact, you can eat many of the foods you love, even desserts—as long as they’re part of an overall healthy diet. The key is moderation. Eating the right amount of all kinds of food is what is most important to your diet. However, what works for someone else may not work for you. Consult with a nutritionist to figure out what kind of diet you should follow, since it’ll help in understanding how many calories and what kinds of food you should consume every day.

Know your carb intake

Another useful approach to diet planning is tracking calories and macros. Understanding the proper breakdown of proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your diet is just as important as knowing your calorie intake. To manage or avert diabetes, it’s essential to keep a close eye on carbohydrates, as it directly impacts glucose levels in the body. Tracking the amount of carbs you consume in each meal can help stabilize your blood glucose and, in turn, control diabetes.

It may seem easier to be off carbohydrates for good, and some people with diabetes find success in low- or no-carb diets. But be careful as a diet low in carbs, and high in protein and fat is highly restrictive, hard to follow for an extended period of time, and may not be healthy in the long run. Since carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels, restricting your intake while on insulin or certain type 2 medications could set you up for low blood glucose. In addition to that, these diets are high in saturated fat, which can raise your risk of heart disease.

In conclusion, while it may be okay for a person to eat their favourite foods, an overall healthy diet and lifestyle is a necessity to prevent diabetes.

Sign up for our premium plan to get a personalized diet and workout routine from India’s top coaches and certified diabetes educators.



Comments:

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  2. Condan

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  3. Gozilkree

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  4. Nile

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