‘MasterChef’ Contestant Arrested After Being ‘Possessed’ by Gordon Ramsay



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The contestant, Josh Marks, claimed Ramsay turned him into God

Former 'MasterChef' contestant Josh Marks blamed his strange behavior on Gordon Ramsay, saying that he "possessed" him.

Season 3 MasterChef contestant Josh Marks was arrested in Chicago this week following a violent incident with members of the police.

According to a TMZ report, a University of Chicago campus policeman saw Marks, with cuts on his face, trying to use one of the university’s emergency phones. When the policeman approached Marks, the chef leapt at him, punched him, and tried to grab his gun.

Several cops attempted to subdue Marks, who reportedly told them that Gordon Ramsay, the host of MasterChef, is an “a**hole” and that he “possessed his body and then transformed him into God.” The police arrested him and brought him to the hospital, where he reportedly remains chained to his bed. There is allegedly no evidence that the chef had been using drugs.

Marks’ attorney told TMZ that medical professionals are evaluating him to see if his bizarre behavior could be related to mental illness. “The Josh that you are hearing about in police reports this morning is not the spirited Gentle Giant that we know,” she added of the 7-foot-2-inch chef.


I am a "MasterChef" survivor

By Jessie Glenn
Published February 18, 2018 12:30AM (UTC)

Gordon Ramsay on "MasterChef" (FOX/Greg Gayne)

Shares

If you take 300 people and push them to an extreme stress level, some of them will die under the pressure. I believe producers of reality shows know this is true. There are no former reality show contestants who will candidly discuss the process of casting and filming a major reality show because the contracts contestants sign contain nondisclosure agreements in addition to frank threats against their family and friends. And, elements of reality show casting are horrific enough to deserve a transparent discussion. Full of dangerous, dirty secrets no one can talk about the full details except me, an unlikely candidate from the start. The only explanation I have is that my interest was accelerated by a desire to please, an insensate understanding of pop culture and a pathological curiosity.

When my husband Billy and his daughter Lila moved in with me and my children in 2008, they brought with them a riot of pop culture we had never been exposed to. As I sorted through the novel offerings I understood two things almost immediately: I hated video games the most and liked cooking shows the best. We had watched “Hell’s Kitchen” for two years already when “MasterChef” began its run in 2010. Billy got me hooked in the first season. I dug into the sort of anxiety that resolves deliciously at the end of each season and enjoyed recreating and embellishing the food in my own kitchen. We watched season 2 but, really, I watched Billy watch the second season. He liked watching it, and I wanted to be the thing he liked watching.

Even with my limited knowledge of reality shows, I knew that real people became unreal characters. I’d long understood that the caveat to my lifelong atheism was that though there is no one creator god, all gods are real, because people create them through belief. Once made, gods take on their own power. It’s not just mental illness that causes a person to think a god voice has spoken to them. It’s also that the god has been brought into existence as a character with a measure of his or her own free will. Same with reality show contestant fame. Did I want my husband to see me on television as a kitchen goddess creature brought into existence for a moment? Yes, I did. I wanted to be more special than a person. That impulse alone is both questionable and problematic for a person weighing the odds of a dangerous decision. And I imagine it’s a feeling shared by most people wanting to be reality stars.

The casting process that no one is allowed to talk about occurs in multiple stages. Most contestants send a video, then go and prepare a “signature dish” in person at various tryouts around the country (I drove to Seattle to do mine), at which point the “signature dish” is graded by subcontracted cooking school judges in secret. If they pass you on, the next step is filling out reams of paperwork that end up coaxing a TV-ready backstory and a streamlined brand where, before, there was simply a person.

For other contestants there is a different path. Quite a few of the “kooky” contestants, the ones with puppets and spells and flying falcons, are recruited, but for comic relief rather than a quick advance to the finals. They are Hollywood eccentric staples. Christine Ha, however, the winner of season 3, was recruited based on her Blind Chef cooking blog. Luca, winner of season 4, was recruited after an unsuccessful tryout with me in season 3. For me, this raised the question: Do they choose the winner before the first tryouts?

For us regular schlubs, once you pass the next few rounds of casting online, you get to fly to LA (which you pay for yourself). You gather with some of the other contestants in a nondescript meeting room at The Doubletree Hotel in Culver City and you all complete a two-hour-long personality psych test reminiscent of the somewhat outdated Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) . The test is analyzed by a computer while you wait and the results are then given to a psychiatrist who meets with each potential contestant. You do not get to see the results. It seemed to me that the point of the test is to judge what dramatic traits each person has that could be harvested later for a plot twist.

I filled out the questionnaire carefully, consistently, and not at all truthfully. “You’re a real rule follower, hmm?” asked the tall, fit examiner, who looked as if he could be a psychiatrist out of central casting himself. “I suppose so,” I answered blandl y. I knew that tests with multiple similar questions asked in different ways are testing for lies. But, I think I beat it. The doctor figure asked a lot of other questions about mental health and what I guessed were follow-up questions for: hypochondriasis, hysteria, psychopathic deviation and hypomania, among other conditions . More generally, the test was an attempt to predict behavior in various situations. Or, what TV producers would call plotlines. Over the course of the 15-minute interview I peppered posed naïveté with sassy, authentic eye contact, thus maintaining the brand I had created without breaking character. Had he worked for other shows, I asked? My voice pitched higher than usual. “Yes!’” he said, “‘The Biggest Loser,’ ‘American Idol,’ all the Fox shows.”

I was too pissed at the thought of his sadistic prying into the vulnerable psyches of the idiots who would want to go on reality TV to maintain my “PNW Organic Mom 2.0” profile. “What about that First Do No Harm clause in your medical training?” I asked, my eyes narrowing now. I never imagined I would actually get to say that to a doctor in real life. I wanted to make him uncomfortable.

“We’re done here,” he said, opening the door. “Go see the private investigator now.”

The experience with the “MasterChef” detective felt just as invasive. No, I never modeled underwear for softcore porn. I don’t think? I’m sure I did many worse things he didn’t ask about, though, and I sweated guilt. He must have known I was guilty. I can’t remember what he looked like or how long I was in his office. Was I ever arrested? I don’t remember. What will the financial credit report, arrest records, residential history and historical reports he ordered dig up ? Because I’ve done nothing. Right ?

I flew back home to Portland, Oregon, the same day I left and felt wild, violated and alive. The blood and pee samples I had to send to them from the lab after I got home felt like no big deal after the professional interrogation. Submit. Submit your blood, they said. Yes, sir. I did.

I passed the next round of casting and they sent me the final multiple contracts by email and I sent them back 17 bulleted questions about the details because oh my god, they were unbelievable documents. Any part of myself that desired to please got trampled by the part that liked to win.

In the “MasterChef” contract, which a casting director later told me was essentially identical to those of most reality competition shows, they asked me to agree to be subjected to physical and mental distress, to agree to have my medical history used in any way that they wanted and to use it in perpetuity, to agree that my family would likely not be contacted in the case of an emergency. They asked me to release the show and its employees from liability for any injury to myself from risks both known and unknown. They asked that I release them from liability from the social and economic losses that could result and to please note that the consequences could be substantial and could permanently change the future for me, my family, friends and significant others.

They asked for a clause that could have kept me from working at my own media publicity company and to remove my own company website on their request.

They asked me to agree to pay a 15 percent “management fee” to a company called One Potato Two Potato (OPTP) owned by . . . Gordon Ramsay. This fee would then apply to any income or even gifts I received in any context potentially related to the show . I asked if OPTP would do any other career management. No, they said.

Despite the huge number of questions I asked, and despite the lawyers that they undoubtedly employed along with the detectives and psychiatrists, somehow someone missed that I never sent back the signed contract. I promised nothing.

The day before all the contestants arrived, the casting department called to say I had made the cut. I was a contestant. They were flying me out to LA the next day. Clearly, I was a replacement for someone else who dropped out at the last minute and I figured, fuck it. I never signed anything waiving any of my rights and as the daughter of a journalist, I’m genetically hardwired to be curious. It was the most perfect setup for a pathologically inquisitive, masochistic exhibitionist that ever was. I couldn’t wait to get there.

The contestant minders were called wranglers. They were all gorgeous. Perry was the lead wrangler but her official title was Contestant Coordinator. There were quite a few wranglers and in my memory they run together into one attractive, fit, amoral blur. All of the contestants stayed in a hotel for the first two days and, pelted with questions, the wranglers told us some things and would not tell us other things. It was hurry up and wait and whisper and guess. We spent all the time asking what was happening and where we were going and when we were eating. They got direction through earbuds which would then be transmitted to us.

There was an odd assembly where a producer (who appeared to be an actor) assured us that all the contestants had the same chance of winning or he would get in trouble with some official body and we should try our hardest. Then a member of the “official body” came on stage and shook his finger at the phony-looking producer and the producer pretended to be scared. It was like watching a psych version of WWF.

Everyone there besides me seemed like they were OK with believing whatever they were told. The contestants applauded and shrieked like initiates in a revival tent. Each one was a winner. They all just knew it. I was almost jealous. I missed out on the orgy of emotion and faith that the reality show congregants trampled over each other to prove.

We contestants were each interviewed during the first two days in front of a production set of fake produce, a regular horn of plenty, where I refused to be filmed holding the Walmart bag. We weren’t allowed out of the hotel room unless we were with the wranglers, who would take us on one or two outings, either to the hotel pool or a burger place, where we would share enormous confidences with one another. Explosive familiarity bloomed in these small portions of time we were able to see other people, strangers, who were all equally anxious to unfold their shininess to other shiny strangers after the stress of staying hours in a hotel room with antagonists and no phones. Because the wranglers made a huge deal out of telling us our roommate selections were random. And because that appeared impossible.

Everything the wranglers said seemed a pretty obvious setup to me to add intensity and create plotlines. I could see it from the outside (I kept a notebook, of course) and the artifice was fascinating and well done. From the inside it felt . . . gross. They had asked me about religion Atheist, I said. And food: all local and organic! So I was roomed with a devout Evangelical Christian woman who used sugar, Rice Krispies and food coloring to make statues of the judges’ heads, which she brought with her from Texas. The Palestinian and the Israeli were roomed together (the Israeli contestant dropped out before the end of the weekend). The short, anxious, possibly gay man and the bully banker. The flamboyant opera singer and the dead-eyed animal tracker. Contestants chosen for the producers’ raw accessibility to stereotyped plotlines. Locked in together for hours. Fascinating. Cruel. Effective. More than any other experience in my life, the wranglers exemplified the ideology of “just following orders.”

Once filming started we had 14-hour days on set while contestants took turns cooking, then either failed or made it through to the next round. Our clothing was assigned the first day and cleared with costume and we wore the same thing each day as the musky people smell increased and slept-in hairstyles were prodded back to center. As the people who didn’t get an apron left each day, the remaining contestants’ relationships grew more intense. The man with the puppets who read handwriting samples, the pastor’s wife from Detroit, the witch who tried to put a spell on the judges and the vegan bread maker who was shocked (shocked!) to hear that yeast was alive left fairly quickly. The Jamaican Marine cooking peas and rice the Italian cook who came back to win season 4 the gentle Hawaiian man whose parents promised to kill me a pig the fabulous, black, Christian opera singer the racist, alcoholic redneck, they mostly stayed till the end of the week.

The shiniest people were obvious from the beginning. The star power of Felix Fang, the technique and focus of Becky Reams, the staggering capability of blind contestant Christine Ha and the hugely tall, kind, food lover and former Army Corps of Engineers contract specialist Josh Marks outshined the rest of us, as we all stretched our powers of charisma.

My tryout was at the last part of the last day of the weeklong tryouts. The only people left were the ones who were continuing along to the next episode and the set was quieter than the days before. My dad (the journalist), my husband, my brother and his wife (pop culture enthusiasts), our three kids and my brother’s daughter flew down to California to watch while I cooked.

That morning, I left my wallet in the hotel room and future finalist Josh Marks noticed I was desperate for some coffee. “I got it!” he said. I blushed. I hate accepting things from people I don’t know well. “I’ll get you back when you’re famous,” I said. As if I didn’t care. “Absolutely,” he answered cheerfully. But I didn’t get the chance to buy Josh Marks a cup of coffee. No one has been able to do that for several years now.

On set through the day, the pressure mounted. I am not generally fazed by strangers trying to stress me out, but the wranglers and interviewers are pros. They also try out for the job that they have and the skill is being able to set people off balance. When contestants talk into the camera in a reality show, they are answering questions that have been carefully and tactically worded to create an interestingly uncomfortable moment. I was surprised to find myself flustered. I burned the goddamn garlic. Why did I decide to use a Japanese mandolin when I had never used one before? Because I wanted to know how it worked just like I wanted to know how a reality TV show worked. But, it turns out solving puzzles with a clock running down while people try to destabilize you is less satisfying on set than in real life.

Like the scene from “The Wizard of Oz,” I walked slowly past the crowd pushing a cart with my signature dish on in through the black curtain darkness with all of the videographers and wranglers dressed in black, motionless, watching me and suddenly: there I was in a cavernous room. Gordon Ramsay , Graham Elliot and Joe Bastianich were elevated on a stage in front of me, brightly lit god-men.

They each asked me about the dish (it’s an egg frittata with California asparagus and goat butter Hollandaise! All sourced within five miles of the warehouse and all organic!). Branding myself as “Portland Locavore” was a no-brainer. They each walked down from the stage one at a time and tasted then, an airplane flew over the warehouse. “Damn, that ruined the ambience,” said Graham. I started cracking up. “OK, again,” said one of the interviewers. I regained my lack of awe.

“Beauty shot,” said the cameraman. “We want to take a long still of your plate.” I backed off obediently and then realized they were filming me, not the plate. That was how they got those odd shots of people nervously waiting right before a commercial break. I stared back at the camera, eyes as flat as possible. Fuck. No.

“No,” said Joe. “Yes,” said Graham. Then I remembered — they had already interviewed me about this — “which judge’s 'yes' vote would be most important and emotional for you?” I had told them, well, Graham will say yes, Joe will say no, so Gordon’s the swing vote. Which is how they wrote it. So that I would react.

I knew I wouldn’t get an apron because I was a replacement contestant from the start, plus I wouldn’t hold the Walmart bag. As I watched during the week, I learned that the food had little to do with moving past the first round. The tryout round was to watch contestants for telegenic qualities, one-liners and quick responses on camera and potential plotlines between contestants. The second round knocked out all of the contestants who had compelling, touching backstories but not much cooking experience and/or not enough plotline potential.

“Daaamn. Shame,” Gordon said in his thick British accent. He didn’t like my frittata (burned garlic). “But the goat butter Hollan-dez is rally qu-white good.”

“Thanks!!” I couldn’t help being excited by the verbal pat on the head. I knew that on top of the other egregious actions sustained by the “MasterChef” contestants, Gordon’s management company was waiting to siphon off future earnings from winners. But he was awfully charismatic in person. I think it was season 3 winner Christine Ha who said he smells incredible. I didn’t get close enough and I wasn’t going to be one of those people who asked for a hug in the first round.

There was a dramatic pause in which I felt zero anxiety. “No,” he said. Because I knew he would. I can’t deny a bit of disappointment, though, as much as I would like to. So I didn’t win at not caring entirely, but I gave it my all.

I walked back through the door with no apron and everyone made sad sounds for the camera. I looked at my husband — let’s get the fuck out of here. “Stop. Exit interviews,” said the wrangler.

She wasn’t the wrangler I had been led around by all week and she wasn’t Perry, queen of the wranglers, but she was enough of a voice of authority that I stopped rather than diving through the open door like I wanted to. It might have been Carter. Or Angelic. It’s possible this next part is a stress memory, but I’m nearly certain that the exit interview took place in an elevated boxing ring. Although there’s no good reason there would be a boxing ring in the warehouse. Maybe the ring was there so I wouldn’t contaminate the winners with failure. Losers were very strictly not allowed to speak with other contestants. Once you failed, you no longer belonged.

I rushed through the interview quickly and was so close to the industrial backdoor when another gorgeous anonymous wrangler told me I had to see the psychiatrist again. No, not the same doctor. “Do you harbor any thoughts of killing any of the judges or yourself?” he asked. “No . . . .” said I. They finally let me go.

When I got home I was a little screwed up. Despite knowing that they were messing with me, it worked, probably because I thought I was immune. Anxious, neurotic, easily startled and sobbing off and on for the next week, I was mortified that I could have inadvertently exposed my children to a bout of my depression (self-imposed, no less). I hid as much as possible and it passed in a week or so. The children steadfastly pretended not to notice.

I learned later from speaking with a number of the runner-up cooks that every round longer that a contestant stayed in the competition, the symptoms of traumatic stress appeared more intense when they returned home. Many of the runners-up from each season appear quite damaged. Some are unable to hold jobs, have difficulties with explosive anger. The winners fare somewhat better but not always. I’m still friends with many of them on Facebook and there are secret Facebook groups to talk about all things reality, though interest for most contestants dies off over the years other than blatant self-promotion, fundraising and talk of appearances on other cooking shows.

Despite thinking most of the people who decided to sign that contract were total rubes, the contestants of season 3 were some of the most interesting people I ever met and I don’t doubt that they all had their own reasons for submitting to the abuse. It was a group formed by a casting department for intentionally created, attractive diversity: telegenic people from as many walks of life as they could come up with, who would do practically anything for attention and who loved food. I wouldn’t have traded that part of the experience. But it’s impossible to discuss the experience of being a short-term reality show contestant without noting that some don't emerge from the experience unscathed.

The week the season finished filming, after he lost the finale to Christine Ha, Josh Marks, the self-titled “gentle giant,” was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. He struggled with psychosis. Josh got into several conflicts, including a fight with cops, and heard voices in his head. Police said he claimed he had been possessed by Ramsay. It’s not hard to imagine the god that Gordon Ramsay became through Josh’s deep faith actually manifested. The week before he took his life, Josh was diagnosed with schizophrenia. I met this man’s family. I met his mother, who struggled to find adequate mental health resources for him in Chicago. Josh was kind and decent and excited about his future and starting a restaurant on Martha’s Vineyard and I mourned his death.

All three of our kids told me that reality TV was stupid and that on-set filming was boring. I think they were still annoyed that I tried to leave them for a month. My husband and I never really watched cooking shows again until the “Great British Bake Off” years later. I felt bad about it in a topical way — we had to start watching something else, so thank god for “True Blood.”

An activity I thought would be partially a lark and partially an unprofessional investigation became something else: an experiment in power and submission and subversion over which I had no control. I knew there would be danger, but I thought the danger would give me energy, that it would excite me creatively where a happy marriage and a calm few years had left me feeling dull and soft without the potential for danger. But instead of feeling like a warrior surviving a crucible, I left feeling I had failed to protect the tender people. Eccentric, charismatic strangers, yes, but these fragile egotists couldn’t have completely known the results of professional abuse. Being violated is something that can make people feel alive. But that doesn’t make it safe.

A month after I returned home I got a chatty note from the casting director. “Oh, could you send me those final forms, it seems we don’t have your signed contract.”

“I'm really not at all wild about that idea,” I wrote back.

More forcefully she wrote back: “I’m having legal call you to straighten this out.”


A 7𔃼″ ‘Masterchef’ Contestant Punched A Cop And Claimed He Was Possessed By Gordon Ramsay

Well here’s a hell of a thing: Josh Marks, a 7𔃼″ Season 3 contestant on Fox’s MasterChef, was arrested recently after he punched a police officer and claimed Gordon Ramsay is “an asshole” who possessed his body and transformed him into God.

Law enforcement sources tell us … a University of Chicago cop spotted Josh Marks nearby the campus on Monday He was trying to use a University emergency phone and had obvious cuts on his face. We’re told the cop asked Marks if anything was wrong, and Marks then lunged at him, striking him with a closed fist and then tried to grab his gun.

Our sources say the cop and two other officers tried to subdue the 26-year-old, 7𔃼″ tall culinary runner-up … to no avail. They batoned and pepper sprayed him but it had no effect. Marks broke free and started running. Five cops subdued him in a resident’s backyard. [TMZ]

The TMZ report says there was no evidence of drug use, so it seems like Marks could be dealing with some pretty serious issues here. Hopefully he gets whatever help he needs. Still, he’s dead-on about Gordon Ramsay being an asshole. Let’s at least give him that.


One restaurant closed before the Kitchen Nightmares episode even aired

As we now know, most of the restaurants that appeared on Kitchen Nightmares didn't exactly go on to have successful runs. But some of the restaurants fared worse than others. According to The Daily Mail's report, some restaurants were closed mere months after filming. One restaurant — The Black Pearl in New York — closed just four days after their episode aired. But there is one featured restaurant that takes the cake as the unluckiest of them all: Lela's in Pomona, California closed before viewers even saw the episode.

Before the episode aired, one blogger noted that Lela's website and contact information had been taken offline. According to Screen Rant, the restaurant already faced struggles before Gordon Ramsay got in the door, and was facing bankruptcy after only eight months in business. After the episode was over, a message flashed on viewers' screens saying that, "the restaurant's debts were too much and it closed."


Contents

In this series, the typical MasterChef weekly format was slightly changed from prior series. Mondays now feature a Team Challenge with the losing team facing Tuesday's Pressure Test elimination. Wednesdays feature a Mystery Box with the best cooks competing in the Immunity Challenge on Thursday, in which one contestant will be granted immunity from the upcoming elimination. All the other contestants then head into the All-In Elimination Challenge on Sunday. [10] In addition, only one Immunity Pin was up for grabs this season it was awarded to Dani Venn in the first episode of the series. A new format schedule was debuted on 14 June, with the show beginning to air only three nights a week. Mondays featured the Mystery Box, Tuesdays featured the Immunity Challenge, and Sundays featured the All-In Elimination Challenge.

Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, production of the show continued while following government regulations. [11] This includes the observance of social distancing, having individual plates for each judge during tasting, and the use of gloves when handling ingredients. In addition, the number of crew on set has been reduced by half, and outside challenges and guests have been dialled back. [12] [13] The new measures debuted on 25 May 2020.

Unlike previous seasons, there was no mid-way "second chance" return challenge for eliminated contestants all eliminated contestants had no chance to return to the season.

The 24 returning contestants were announced on 19 February 2020. [14] [15] In March 2020, Ben Ungermann was dropped from the series after being arrested in a matter, unrelated to the show. [16] His departure was announced on 17 May 2020. The arrest was connected to accusations of sexual assault against a 16-year-old girl. [17] Those charges were dropped when Ungermann pleaded guilty to a single count of common law assault, avoiding a criminal conviction. [18]

Contestant Age State Occupation Original Series Previous
Season
Placing
Status
Emelia Jackson 30 VIC Cake Designer & Chef Series 6 3rd Winner 20 July
Laura Sharrad 24 SA Chef & Restaurateur Series 6 2nd Runner-up 20 July
Reynold Poernomo 26 NSW Chef & Restaurateur Series 7 4th Eliminated 19 July
Callum Hann 30 SA Restaurateur & Culinary Educator Series 2 [a] 2nd Eliminated 14 July
Reece Hignell 30 NSW Cake Designer & Chef Series 10 6th Eliminated 12 July
Poh Ling Yeow 46 SA Chef, Artist, Actress & TV Presenter Series 1 [b] 2nd Eliminated 5 July
Tessa Boersma 28 QLD Chef & Criminal Statistician Series 11 2nd Eliminated 28 June
Brendan Pang 26 WA Restaurateur Series 10 9th Eliminated 21 June
Khanh Ong 27 VIC Business Owner & Chef Series 10 3rd Eliminated 14 June
Sarah Tiong 29 NSW Lawyer & Restaurateur Series 9 6th Eliminated 9 June
Simon Toohey 33 VIC Cook & Restaurateur Series 11 3rd Eliminated 7 June
Jess Liemantara 22 VIC Chef Series 10 4th Eliminated 31 May
Tracy Collins 44 SA Restaurateur Series 6 5th Eliminated 24 May
Sarah Clare 33 TAS Restaurateur Series 10 10th Eliminated 19 May
Hayden Quinn 33 NSW TV Presenter & Marine Biologist Series 3 [b] 6th Eliminated 17 May
Ben Ungermann 36 QLD Ice Cream Shop Owner & Chef Series 9 2nd Left 17 May
Amina Elshafei 35 NSW Paediatric Nurse & Author Series 4 11th Eliminated 12 May
Chris Badenoch 52 WA Business Owner & Restaurateur Series 1 [b] 3rd Eliminated 10 May
Rose Adam 42 SA Chef & Café Owner Series 7 10th Eliminated 5 May
Dani Venn 34 VIC Business Owner & Publicist Series 3 [b] 4th Eliminated 3 May
Harry Foster 25 QLD Chef Series 8 3rd Eliminated 28 April
Ben Milbourne 38 TAS Restaurateur Series 4 5th Eliminated 26 April
Courtney Roulston 39 NSW Chef Series 2 5th Eliminated 21 April
Lynton Tapp 32 VIC TV Presenter & Chef Series 5 2nd Eliminated 19 April

  1. ^ Callum won the Masterchef: All-Stars mini-series
  2. ^ abcd These contestants also competed on the Masterchef: All-Stars mini-series.

-Emelia Jackson appeared on the 3rd Junior Series as a guest judge for a Mystery Box Challenge.

-Emelia appeared on the following season as a guest judge for the first Mystery Box challenge. Reynold Poernomo, Callum Hann and Poh Ling Yeow appeared later on as guest judges for an elimination challenge. Laura Sharrad appeared for the first Masterclass as a guest chef.

Allegations of favouritism Edit

The series has been met with sustained skepticism from viewers concerning the judges' apparent favouritism towards certain contestants. The most prominent instance of this has centered around contestant Laura Sharrad, who worked in judge Jock Zonfrillo's restaurant for two years following her Series 6 appearance. The criticism has focused largely on Laura's apparent tendency to cook pasta dishes repeatedly, receiving praise from the judges despite her unvaried repertoire. The judges' decision to award Weekly Immunity to Laura, rather than Poh, in Episode 50, was met with instant backlash from viewers, who felt that Poh's effort was evidently superior. [19] Laura spoke out about her controversy, citing the numerous non-pasta dishes she has cooked on the show and claiming that having to cook for her former employer has made the competition harder, rather than easier, for her. [20]

Other accusations have attacked the judges' apparent reluctance to eliminate contestants Poh Ling Yeow [21] and Reynold Poernomo, [22] both of whom are considered fan favourites, and, therefore, beneficial to the show's viewership. Notably, contestant Tessa Boersma’s elimination stirred controversy and prompted allegations of bias towards Reynold.


Gordon masterchef

.Han är känd från flera matrelaterade TV-serier såsom Elake kocken, The F-Word, Kitchen Nightmares och Hell's Kitchen, men har även skrivit ett 10-tal kokböcker.Han klassas som en av världens främsta gourmetkockar och driver i dagsläget ett 30-tal restauranger och pubar över hela. Top home cooks compete to become a MasterChef - Mentored by Gordon Ramsay, Aarón Sanchez & Joe Bastianich. Watch Wednesdays at 8/7c on FOX's Summer of Gordon

Gordon Ramsay - Wikipedi

  1. Gordon Houston is a contestant on the fifth season of MasterChef. He ranked in 19th place after withdrawing from the competition due to illness. 1 Personality 2 Season 5 2.1 Episode 1 2.2 Episode 2 2.3 Episode 3 2.4 Episode 4 3 Quotes 4 Trivia 5 External Links He is the first contestant to..
  2. Created by Adeline Ramage Rooney, Ben Adler, Robin Ashbrook. With Gordon Ramsay, Joe Bastianich, Charlie Ryan, Graham Elliot. A nationwide search for the best home cooks in America. One of 50 hopefuls will become a culinary star and one of America's Masterchefs
  3. Gordon James Ramsay OBE (born 8 November 1966) is a British chef, restaurateur, writer, and television personality. He was born in Johnstone, Scotland, and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon, England.His restaurants have been awarded 16 Michelin stars in total and currently hold a total of seven. His signature restaurant, Restaurant Gordon Ramsay in Chelsea, London, has held three Michelin stars.
  4. Gordon Ramsay has been a huge hit with audiences on the newly revamped series of MasterChef. On Thursday night, the fiery celebrity chef's guest role came to an end, and viewers were quick to.
  5. MasterChef is an American competitive cooking reality TV show based on the British series of the same name, open to amateur and home chefs. Produced by Shine America and One Potato Two Potato, it debuted on July 27, 2010 on the Fox network, following the professional cooking competition series Hell's Kitchen.. For the first five seasons, the series starred celebrity chefs Gordon Ramsay (the co.
  6. Gordon has also become a star of the small screen both in the UK and internationally, with shows such as Kitchen Nightmares, Hell's Kitchen, Hotel Hell and MasterChef US. Find out more. Gordon's Simple Marinara at Home. With families spending more time at home as we hunker down during the Global Pandemic,.
  7. Gordon's Chorizo Torta from Ramsay Around the World. Behind the scenes of Gordon, Gino and Fred the American Road Trip, Gordon got inspired to make a sandwich that was enriched with local Mexican ingredients. So he did his spin on a local Torta

Gordon shows how to properly cut a chicken, blindfolded. Subscribe now for more MasterChef clips:. Check out who wins the challenge on Madelaine's Page: https://youtu.be/7aZj_XeqozA To celebrate this summer's all new season of MasterChef, and his billionth.. Gordon Houston, the law student from Irvine California, mysteriously withdrew from the competition before the next challenge, due to an undisclosed illness. There's not too much information available about him since then, although in one Facebook post (on his official MC Facebook page) he mentions studying for and taking the bar exam in July 2014, and offering a few cooking demo's and. MasterChef Junior Knife and Cutting Board Set - Includes Real Cutting Tools for Kids and 15 Recipes. 4.3 out of 5 stars 303. $25.99 $ 25. 99. Get it as soon as Mon, Nov 9. by Christine Ha and Gordon Ramsay | May 14, 2013. 4.7 out of 5 stars 499. Hardcover $23.99 $ 23. 99. Get it as soon as Fri, Nov 6. FREE.

Gordon Ramsay. Ramsay is one of the best-known chefs in the world from his numerous TV series, including MasterChef, MasterChef Jr., Kitchen Nightmares, Hell's Kitchen, Hotel Hell and Gordon. MasterChef Junior was taken on by Fox and has filmed eight seasons as of 2020, and viewers can't seem to get enough. But what's happening behind the scenes — and what's Gordon Ramsay really like with the kids? We decided to take a deeper look. This is the untold truth of MasterChef Junior

Go beyond recipes. Explore the meaning of ingredients, process, presentation. Go inside Gordon Ramsay's kitchen and take your cooking to the next level. Teaching Assistant. 30-Day Money Back. Video Lessons. Hours of Content 10.2m Followers, 6,795 Following, 4,101 Posts - See Instagram photos and videos from Gordon Ramsay (@gordongram Start your free trial to watch MasterChef and other popular TV shows and movies including new releases, classics, Hulu Originals, and more. It's all on Hulu Tosi is joining chefs Gordon Ramsay and Graham Elliot as the show's third judge. MasterChef season six is set to air this Summer. Eater Video: Lidia Bastianich makes Gnocchi at hom

MasterChef Watch Wednesdays at 8/7c on FO

  1. Gordon Ramsay Restaurants Limited uses cookies to store or access information on your device to help us understand the performance of the website and to personalise your experience when browsing our website. To get more information, or to amend your preferences, press the Cookie settings button
  2. MasterChef. 4,064,668 likes · 15,122 talking about this. Watch MasterChef anytime on FOX NOW or Hulu
  3. Masterchef USA. Gordon Ramsay hosts the stateside version of the top cooking contest. The final 30 compete in an onion cutting challenge, before an egg challenge decides the final 14
  4. Gordon Ramsay Returns To The MasterChef Kitchen. 06 Apr 2020. 06 Apr 2020. Get ready, 'cause your favourite outspoken chef is back for the entire first week! The final countdown has begun with the season premiere of MasterChef Australia: Back To Win, on Monday, 13 April (Easter Monday) at 7.30pm on 10 and 10 play
  5. Gordon Ramsay has paid tribute to Ben Watkins, after his death aged 14.. The talented youngster had taken part on the Gordon-hosted MasterChef Junior at just 11. Ben had been undergoing treatment.
  6. Gordon Ramsay was saddened to learn that one of MasterChef Junior's contestants had died earlier this week. Ben Watkins passed away from cancer at 14-years-old, his family confirmed

Gordon Houston MasterChef Wiki Fando

  1. Gordon Ramsay leads tributes as MasterChef Junior star Ben Watkins dies, aged 14. Aspiring cook has been diagnosed with an incredibly rare tumou
  2. In 2018, the then 11-year-old appeared on the sixth season of Gordon Ramsay's MasterChef Junior. He ended up placing in the top 18. I adored our time cooking and laughing together on set.
  3. Gordon Ramsay paid tribute to Ben Watkins (Picture: Getty/BBC) A 'heartbroken' Gordon Ramsay has paid an emotional tribute to MasterChef Junior contestant Ben Watkins who has died from cancer.
  4. —Gordon Ramsay (@GordonRamsay) November 17, 2020 A tribute from the official MasterChef Junior Twitter account called Watkins a tremendous role model for chefs of all ages. —MasterChef.
  5. Gordon and Ben's former MasterChef Junior competitors sent him a special video earlier this year when he was battling cancer, letting him know they were praying for him and helping raise.
  6. Gordon Ramsay has admitted he is heartbroken following the death of Masterchef Junior star Ben Watkins. The season six contestant passed away on Monday at the age of 14, following a year-and-a-half long battle with cancer. Taking to Instagram following the news of Ben's passing, celebrity chef.

MasterChef Junior 2018 contestant Ben Watkins dies of cancer at 14, Gordon Ramsay offers condolence - The Watkins family shared a statement via their attorney. Ben suffered more than his share in his fourteen years on this Earth, but we take solace in that his suffering is finally over and in that, in the end, Ben knew he was loved by so many, the statement read Gordon Ramsay paid his tribute to former Masterchef Junior contestant, Ben Watkins, who died at the age of 14. Ben Watkins died at the age of 14 following his battle with cancer the news was confirmed by TMZ first. According to the reports, Ben was diagnosed with a rare kind of cancer Gordon Ramsay has led the tributes to MasterChef Junior contestant Ben Watkins, who has died aged 14. Weeks after sending the aspiring chef a video wishing him well, Ramsay remembered him as an incredibly talented home cook and even stronger young man. Watkins appeared in season six of the All details on the site celebsbar.co Gordon Ramsay and the cast of MasterChef Junior sent a video message to cheer Ben Watkins up when he was in the hospita Gordon Ramsay was saddened to learn that one of MasterChef Junior's contestants had died earlier this week. Ben Watkins passed away from cancer at 14-years-old, his family confirmed. He had been undergoing treatment for a rare form of the disease at Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago where he died on Monday. Ben was 11 at

MasterChef US season 5 features MasterChef judges Gordon Ramsay, Graham Elliot and Joe Bastianich testing the culinary skills of amateur chefs from the USA with a number of challenges and dishes to prepare, with those failing to impress being sent home.. MasterChef US Season 5 aired March 26 to September 15, 2014 on Fox Network, there were 22 contestants and the prize for the winner was. Vi skulle vilja visa dig en beskrivning här men webbplatsen du tittar på tillåter inte detta Gordon Ramsay returns for 'MasterChef Junior' season 8, which will premiere in the fall of 2020. (FOX) MasterChef Junior is always a fun and exciting learning experience for the kid contestants

It's crunch time for the top four MasterChef contestants as they enter finals week. And in a trailer aired at the end of Sunday's episode, Gordon Ramsay announced his return to the series MasterChef Gordon Ramsay is known for his fiery temper and high standards. It seems that his exacting demands in the kitchen also apply to his choice of watches. Despite having a small watch collection (that is, compared to other celebrities), his timepieces are impressive - and are some of the best ever created

Gordon Ramsay, MasterChef Australia Gordon Ramsay: Gjort til latter Den britiske stjernekokken latterliggjøres etter gjesteopptreden på MasterChef Australia Fox MASTERCHEF: Host / Judge Gordon Ramsay. The season 10 two-hour finale of MasterChef airs on Wednesday, September 18 at 8/7c on Fox. The season. MasterChef is a competitive cooking reality TV show originating from the British series of the same name, open to amateur and home chefs. The contestants are home and amateur cooks whom participate in an intense culinary competition, fighting for the following: the title of MasterChef, the MasterChef trophy, the opportunity to write their own cookbook, and a salary of $250,000 MasterChef USA Season 1 Winner - Whitney Miller (Year: 2010) Gordon Ramsay, on the other hand, has already hosted 6 regular seasons of MasterChef USA. The first season has started on July 27, 2010 and it ended on September 15, 2010. The winner was a 22-year-old college student, Whitney Miller MasterChef is set to crown its season 10 champion tonight, but it appears the winner has already been leaked online

Gordon Ramsay, Producer: Hell's Kitchen. Scottish by birth, Gordon Ramsay was brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon, England. With an injury prematurely putting an end to any hopes of a promising career in football, he went back to college to complete a course in hotel management. His dedication and natural talent led him to train with some of the world's leading chefs, such as Albert Roux. Are you a home cook who longs to show Gordon Ramsay and the other judges on MasterChef that you have what it takes to be a master chef?Could you outcook dozens of reality television competitors and take home the title of MasterChef, not to mention the $250,000 grand prize and a chance to become a professional chef Masterchef S06E19 Team Gordon Ramsay - Part 01. EnltElena4234. 2:31. MasterChef Junior Junior w_ Gordon Ramsay-Kg7von5NnDk. Bpe55680. 1:00. Gordon Ramsay Demonstrates How To Prepare A Lobster Dish _ Season 8 Ep. 17 _ MASTERCHEF-xF1GEuveogk. Xar51302. 1:17

Masterchef (TV Series 2010- ) - IMD

  • MasterChef Faceoff: 10 Savoury Gordon Ramsay Recipes & 10 Christina Tosi Desserts. Christina Tosi and Gordon Ramsay specialize in two very different flavour profiles - sweet versus savoury. By Nekisha McLeod Nov 18, 2018. Share Share Tweet Email Comment
  • Watch Masterchef US Season 10 Episode 3 Gordon's Mystery Box - US Series on Dailymotio
  • MasterChef es un programa de televisión estadounidense, conducido principalmente por el reconocido chef Gordon Ramsay. [1] Debutó en televisión el 27 de julio de 2010 en el canal Fox. [2] El programa consiste en un concurso de chefs amateurs probando sus más elevadas habilidades para preparar guisados y postres de la más alta calidad, llevando consigo un límite de tiempo
  • Gordon Ramsay ('MasterChef') Gordon Ramsay chats about the nationwide search for America's first-ever MasterChef. 27/07/2010 We've already heard what Graham Elliot and Joe Bastianich had to say.
  • 'MasterChef' season 10 is returning to Fox soon, so here's what you need to know about Gordon Ramsay's show, including cast details, episode info, how to watch, and more

MasterChef - S12 Ep. 1 Your favourites are back for another crack at the coveted MasterChef title. Up for grabs tonight is this season's only immunity pin and joining them all week is chef extraordinaire, Gordon Ramsay Your favourites are back for another crack at the coveted MasterChef title. Up for grabs is this season's only immunity pin and joining them all week is chef extraordinaire, Gordon Ramsay. Watch MasterChef Australia - English Reality TV Serial on Disney+ Hotstar now MasterChef. 2010 All 2 Seasons Competition Reality TV. In this fiery culinary showdown, amateur cooks participate in dish-centric challenges and face pressure tests in their quest to be named the best chef. Starring: John Torode,Gregg Wallace,Gordon Ramsay. Creators: Franc Roddam. Watch all you want. JOIN NOW. Episodes MasterChef Whether it be for his no holds barred approach or his inner soft side, Gordon Ramsay has quickly become a fan favourite during the first week of 'MasterChef Australia: Back To Win'

Viewers despair over chef Gordon Ramsay's departure from

  1. MasterChef is one of many reality series currently on television as part of celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay's culinary growing empire. On this particular series, he and two other judges welcome everyday home cooks and invite them to show off their signature dishes and skills
  2. It was incredible having Gordon Ramsay in the MasterChef kitchen. Relive the exciting week that wa
  3. Gordon Ramsay is making an exciting appearance on MasterChef Australia this season for the very first time. He's set to join Australian judges Gary Mehigan, Matt Preston and George Calombaris. A.
  4. MasterChef contestant Chris Badenoch has hit back at Gordon Ramsay after the British chef tore him a new one in Tuesday night's episode
  5. Amongst the television shows Gordon Ramsay has been a part of, some are Nightmares, Masterchef, Masterchef Junior and Hotel Hell, which is the American version of Hell's Kitchen. The American series of MasterChef started in 2010 and Gordon Ramsay has been the judge of all the 10 seasons
  6. If you watched the most recent season of Gordon Ramsay's MasterChef, then you probably teared up a little when Ramsay pulled an Oprah and promised to pay for 19-year-old contestant Gabriel.
  7. Masterchef season 10 premieres tonight, May 29, 2019 at 8/7c on Fox. Judges this season includes Chef Gordon Ramsay, chef Aarón Sanchez, Joe Bastianich

Gordon Ramsay's 'MasterChef' features two Arizona chefs vying for $250,000 A Queen Creek day-care owner and a Peoria engineer are competing on MasterChef this season gordon ramsay flavor master chef flavors flavortown. Gordon Ramsay Masterchef GIF by FOX TV. Dimensions: 480x270. Size: 800.3310546875KB. Frames: 21.

. Who's first into Grand Finale Week Gordon Ramsay is set to judge a junior version of MasterChef.. Fox has ordered the show alongside the chef's other projects on the network - MasterChef, Hell's Kitchen, Hotel Hell and Kitchen. Gordon Ramsay pays tribute to Ben Watkins, the 14-year-old 'MasterChef Junior' star who died of a rare cance

Gordon Ramsay has penned a heartfelt post in honour of MasterChef Junior star Ben Watkins, who died aged 14 after a cancer All details on the site celebsbar.co Gordon Ramsay has paid tribute to Ben Watkins, after his death aged 14. The talented youngster had taken part on the Gordon-hosted MasterChef Junior at just 11. Ben had been undergoing treatment amid a battle with a rare form of cancer at Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago. His family confirmed that he died on Monday A MasterChef Junior teenager died three years after losing his parents in a brutal murder and suicide Ben Watkins competed in the US version of the 2018 reality show hosted by Gordon Ramsay After appearing on the show, Watkins was diagnosed with vascular fibro-histioma, a rare soft tissue tumor that occurs most commonly in children and young adults Gordon Ramsay has earned a reputable reputation in the food industry. While his brash style of criticizing other cooks and chefs has become one of the things people love about him, his talents and skills in cooking are, also, part of the equation Gordon Ramsay was back to his old tricks during MasterChef: Back To Win on Tuesday night

Köp online Gordon Ramsey, Master Chef (409532628) Äkta autografer - Övrigt • Avslutad 29 jul 19:19. Skick: Begagnad Utropspris 95 kr Auktion • Tradera.co MasterChef, FOX's culinary competition show where chefs compete against one another in a battle to be the best, which stars Gordon Ramsay and an array of other celebrity chefs as the judging panel, has graced American televisions since 2010.The U.S. iteration is based on the original U.K. series, MasterChef, which ran from 1990 to 2001.. Gordon Ramsay. Ethan Miller/Getty Images Ramsay was once the richest chef in the world, due in part to his many television shows including Hell's Kitchen, Kitchen Nightmares, MasterChef, Hotel Hell, and Faking It Marks had claimed MasterChef star Chef Gordon Ramsay had possessed him and turned him into God. The Josh that you are hearing about in police reports this morning is not the spirited Gentle Giant that we know, Marks' attorney said via Facebook following the summer arrest Gordon Ramsay stars in MasterChef, the new series that takes amateur chefs - many of whom simply cook as a hobby - and attempts to turn one of them into a culinary master

Watch full episodes of MasterChef and get the latest breaking news, exclusive videos and pictures, episode recaps and much more at TVGuide.co Find GIFs with the latest and newest hashtags! Search, discover and share your favorite Gordon Ramsey GIFs. The best GIFs are on GIPHY With the MasterChef Season 10 finale airing Wednesday night, That's right, the winner will get to take home a huge cash prize, as well as get to learn from Gordon Ramsay,. .. Just like in past seasons of MasterChef, this year judges Gordon Ramsay.

back again. Gordon Ramsay returns to Cornish home after infuriating locals in lockdown THE celebrity chef is spending the next four weeks out of London - despite criticism over breaching rules the. Scottish celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay has opened restaurants around the world and hosted such popular TV programs as 'Hell's Kitchen' and 'MasterChef.' Jan 7, 2019 - all about the acid tongued Michelin starred chef,recognisable from t.v shows such as 'kitchen Nightmares','Hells Kitchen','Hotel Hell' and 'The F Word'! Ps. He is so SEXY. <3D<3. See more ideas about gordon ramsay, ramsay, michelin star chef

MasterChef (American TV series) - Wikipedi

MasterChef recap reveals who won Season 10. Final three home cooks were Dorian Hunter, Nick DiGiovanni, and Sarah Faherty High quality Gordon Ramsay gifts and merchandise. Inspired designs on t-shirts, posters, stickers, home decor, and more by independent artists and designers from around the world. All orders are custom made and most ship worldwide within 24 hours MasterChef has become a summer staple over the years, so suffice it to say, people are always eager to check it out. Yet, things are a little bit different this summer. While Fox is actively promoting episodes airing starting on Wednesday, it is not actually the new 11th season that was previously announced Details File Size: 2037KB Duration: 1.480 sec Dimensions: 498x280 Created: 8/11/2019, 7:09:10 P

Gordon Ramsay - International Chef and Restaurateur

  1. The king of culinary TV, Gordon Ramsay is serving up on MasterChef Australia. Here, he talks about raising normal, hardworking kids and his new baby boy
  2. What Gordon Ramsay Is Really Like on 'MasterChef' What Gordon Ramsay Is Really Like on 'MasterChef' Chef Aarón Sánchez dishes behind-the-scenes details on the show's new season, premiering May 30
  3. MasterChef runner-up Joshua Marks was in the battle of his life fighting mental illness when he killed himself Friday, his family said Sunday

Gordon Ramsay's Recipes Gordon Ramsa

  • If you are a fan of Aaron Sanchez, Joe Bastianich, or even the little-known Gordon Ramsay, you've likely been watching this season—the tenth!—of MasterChef.Stakes have never been higher: In.
  • The only chef on the Celebrity 100, Ramsay has 35 restaurants worldwide and stars in TV shows including 'Hell's Kitchen' and 'MasterChef.' Ramsay sold a 50% stake in his North American holding.
  • Chef Gordon Ramsay certainly isn't going anywhere. FOX has just renewed MasterChef, one of his four FOX TV series, for a fourth [] Vote Up 1 0 Vote Down Repl
  • Tweet Award-winning chef Gordon Ramsay invites America's top amateur cooks to battle it out in MasterChef USA. It's a mouth-watering feast as wannabe chefs from all over the US try and prove they have what it takes to make a mark on the culinary world as they get grilled by the fearsome Ramsay and his kitchen cohorts
  • MasterChef will be back in 2020 to give us the opportunity to yell at the contestants and marvel at the often surprising words and noises that come out of Gregg Wallace and John Torode's mouths.
  • Gordon Ramsay looking for a new junior MasterChef in Connecticut. By News Staff. Updated 12:53 pm EST, Tuesday, January 29, 201

Gordon Shows Off His Chicken Cutting Skills Season 10 Ep

Masterchef Australia Season 12: One week in, here's what we think about Back to Win The first week of Masterchef Australia Season 12 saw Gordon Ramsay as the guest judge along with the new trio of judges. But as much as we love the contestants this time, it's a little hard to love the show Pregnant Daphne Oz Joins Judges Gordon Ramsay and Aarón Sanchez for MasterChef Junior Season 8 this link is to an external site that may or may not meet accessibility guidelines Gordon James Ramsay Jr. OBE (born 8 November 1966) is a British chef, restaurateur, writer, television personality, food critic, and former footballer. Born in Johnstone, Scotland, and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, Ramsay's restaurants have been awarded 16 Michelin stars in total and currently hold a total of 7. His signature restaurant, Restaurant Gordon Ramsay in Chelsea, London.

Gordon Ramsay vs Madelaine Petsch In VEGAN MASTERCHEF COOK

  • John Torode and Gregg Wallace search for the country's next master chef. Series 10 homepage. Series 9 View episodes. John Torode and Gregg Wallace search for the country's next masterchef
  • The guest judge flew in from the UK to mentor and critique the very first week of MasterChef's new look season, and he made a beeline for Poh to give her his hot tip. ' I'm gonna tell you something really important now. You're the favourite,' he said. She was visibly shocked and immediately rattled. ' Oh, Gordon! You can't say that
  • MasterChef is an American competitive cooking reality TV show based on the British series of the same name, open to amateur and home chefs. Produced by Shine America and One Potato Two Potato, it debuted on July 27, 2010 on the Fox network, following the professional cooking competition series Hell's Kitchen

MasterChef US Season 5: Where Are They Now

Deanna Colon, who was ultimately eliminated in last night's episode, put an interesting spin on her Chef Gordon-inspired dish. Here's how it all played out New series premieres Sunday, June 7 at 10/9c on National Geographic ‎Throughout Season Eight of MASTERCHEF, award-winning chef Gordon Ramsay and renowned pastry chef Christina Tosi will be joined by celebrated chef and restaurateur Aarón Sánchez on the judges' panel, as they put the Top Forty contestants through a series of challenges and elimination rounds, in orde Synopsis:Talented home cooks see if they have what it takes to be real chefs while competing for $250,000 and the chance to publish their own cookbook in this reality-cooking series A Scottish celebrity chef, a travel writer, and a former winner of MasterChef Australia. These are the three people the popular cooking show hope will reinvigorate the program for its 12th season


Reality Tv Revisited

MasterChef US season 4 features MasterChef judges Gordon Ramsay, Graham Elliot and Joe Bastianich testing the culinary skills of amateur chefs from the USA with a number of challenges and dishes to prepare, with those failing to impress being sent home.

MasterChef US Season 4 aired May 22 to September 11, 2013 on Fox Network, there were 19 contestants and the prize for the winner was $250,000, their own cookbook and a MasterChef trophy.

Adriana Guillen was a College Admissions Manager from New York City. She was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 5 after her cheesecake landed her in the bottom three.

After MasterChef, Adriana started a Youtube channel cooking vegetarian food and a private Chef company called Authentically Mexican | Deliciously Vegetarian.

Bime Cruz was a Boxing Coach from Taunton, Massachusetts. He was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 10 after his runny lemon meringue pie landed him in the bottom three.

After MasterChef, Bime worked at Stoneforge Tavern before moving to The Foundry an American Table & Bar. As of March 2018, he is Head Chef at Cibo Matto Caffe.

Bethy Rossos was a PE Teacher from Estacada, Oregon. She was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 15 after her mushroom dish left her in the bottom three.

After MasterChef, Bethy offered cookery classes and private catering services, runs her own waffles food truck and in 2016 represented the state of Oregon in the 13th annual Great American Seafood Cook-Off. She was the host of television show Adrenaline Hunter in 2011 and posts recipes on her website here.

Bri Kozior was a Theater Assistant from Doylestown, Pennsylvania. She was initially eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 16 but won back a place in episode 18. She was eliminated again in episode 20 after her calamari dish landed her in the bottom two.

After MasterChef, Bri became a Private Chef at her catering company Hashtag Kitchen and a gym instructor. She is currently a Business Development Manager at a pharmaceutical company.

Eddie Jackson was a Former Pro Football Player and Personal Trainer from Americus, Georgia. He was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 17 after a sushi challenge.

After MasterChef, Eddie won Food Network Star Season 11 and owns Rosehill beer garden & Food truck and Fit chef studio gym. He hosted Eddie Jackson's Game Day Playbook and Eddie Jackson’s Fitness Playbook on FoodNetwork.com.

He makes regular appearances on Food Network, he hosted BBQ Blitz, has been a judge on Kids BBQ Championship since 2016 and in 2018, he was the host for Christmas Cookie Challenge.

Beth Kirby was a writer and photographer from Chattanooga, Tennessee. She was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 11 after her crab cake was deemed inedible.

After MasterChef, Beth became a food blogger, won awards for her food photography and teaches cookery workshops. She currently offers business advice to a network of creatives and entrepreneurs via her website here.

Howard Simpson was a Barback from Chattanooga, Tennessee. He was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 9 as his filled pasta dish failed to impress the judges.

After Masterchef, Howard managed a bar before becoming a Chef at Hillstone Restaurants and R+D Kitchen Newport. He worked in restaurant management until 2019 when he opened his own car detailing business.

James Nelson worked in retail sales and was from Victoria, Texas. He was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 22 after his Panna cotta was deemed the worst dish.

After Masterchef, James is Co-Owner and Director of Sales at Bravado Spice, an award winning hot sauce company.

Jessie Lysiak was a Yacht Stewardess from Social Circle, Georgia. Jessie was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 24 after her kobe beef dish failed to impress the judges.

After MasterChef, Jessie returned to her previous career before becoming a private chef. She is married to a professional hockey player. She appeared in the reunion episode in MasterChef season 10.

Jonny Blanchard was a Carpenter from Marlboro, Massachusetts. He was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 12 after his macarons landed him in the bottom two.

After MasterChef, Jonny has become a father to twin boys and continues to cook, although it doesn't appear he has become a chef.

Jordan Roots was a Delivery Driver from Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 19 after his quail dish failed to impress the judges.

After MasterChef, Jordan ran a kickstarter campaign to fund a new food cart but failed to raise $50,000. Alongside continuing his role as a delivery driver, he opened catering business Salted Roots Catering, of which he was Chef and owner. He is currently cooking full time as Head Chef at Wooden Hill Brewing.

Kathy Prieto was an Office Assistant from Bronx, New York. She was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 8 after losing to Luca in a lobster cook off challenge and was offered an internship at one of Gordon's restaurants.

After MasterChef, Kathy did two days of training at Gordon's London restaurant before she was asked not to return. She later opened catering company Fire's Flaming Kitchen.

Krissi Biasiello was a Paralegal from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 23 after a pressure test of cooking chocolate desserts landed her in the bottom two.

After MasterChef, Krissi posted racist and insensitive tweets that were later deleted and she apologised for. She offers private chef and catering services and regularly posts recipes on her blog.

Luca Manfé was a Restaurant Manager from Astoria, New York. He was the MasterChef season 4 winner due to his three course meal impressing the judges and was praised by Gordon for his short ribs.

After MasterChef, Luca launched his cook book "My Italian Kitchen: Favorite Family Recipes". He also launched personal catering service Dinner with Luca and food truck The Lucky Fig. He hosted online cookery classes with other MasterChef winners and does cookery demonstrations and dining experiences. He is a brand ambassador for Donna Italia.

Lynn Chyi was a Systems Administrator from San Diego, California. He was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 18 after plating less perfect eggs than Bime in an elimination challenge.

After Masterchef, Lynn was a photographer and UX designer at Illumina. He is currently Design System Engineering Manager at Workday.

Malcolm Green was unemployed and from Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 6 after coming in the bottom three of a cupcake elimination challenge.

After MasterChef, Malcolm opened catering company Malia's Catering. He has done a number of pop up events and is a baker, creating and selling custom occasion cakes.

Natasha Crnjac was a Stay-at-Home Mom from San Diego, California. She was the MasterChef season 4 runner up with Gordon admitting it was very close.

After MasterChef, Natasha returned to being a Stay-at-Home Mom and briefly offered catering/private chef services. In 2019, she opened Meal Prep Boutique, offering catering services and meal prep delivery in California.

Sasha Foxx was a Singer from Tuscaloosa, Alabama. She was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 4 after struggling with cooking a langoustine dish.

After MasterChef, Sasha appeared on America's Got Talent and continues to further her singing career. She appeared on a number of cookery segments and has done a number of pop up dining experiences.

Savannah Sturges was a Middle School Special Ed. Teacher from San Diego, California. She was eliminated in MasterChef season 4 episode 14 after a chicken pressure test.

After MasterChef, Savannah did a number of events as a private/catering chef and had her own website sharing recipes and advertising private chef services. She continued to teach and is currently Assistant Principal at a High School.


Gordon Ramsay Loses Court Battle Of 'York & Albany' Pub

Gordon Ramsay has lost his court battle against his father-in-law.

Gordon Ramsay has lost his high court battle against his father-in-law Christopher Hutcheson over the rent on a London pub he bought. A deal for the York & Albany near Regent's Park took place when Hutcheson was the celebrity chef's business manager - before their relationship broke down.

Gordon Ramsay has lost his court battle against his father-in-law

Ramsay accused Hutcheson of using a ghostwriter machine - used by authors to sign books and photographs - to forge his signature on a document that made him the personal guarantor for the £640,000 annual rent for the property.

Gordon Ramsay, Tana Ramsay and daughter Matilda - TVChoice Awards 2014 held at the Park Lane Hilton - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 8th September 2014

Gordon Ramsay and son Jack Scott Ramsay - The Sun Military Awards (Millies) 2013 held at the National Maritime Museum - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 11th December 2013


5 Scott Commings – Season 12

Commings, 36 at the time of his win, was awarded the head chef position at the Gordon Ramsay Pub & Grill in Caesar’s Palace, Las Vegas. Unlike other winners who seemed to shine right from the beginning, Commings made a massive comeback on the show to rise from near the bottom of the pack to pull himself together for the win. He showed some serious cooking chops.

Today, he appears to be a partner/owner in his own company, Established Culinary Management, and is a father.


I Am a 'MasterChef' Survivor

If you take 300 people and push them to an extreme stress level, some of them will die under the pressure. I believe producers of reality shows know this is true. There are no former reality show contestants who will candidly discuss the process of casting and filming a major reality show because the contracts contestants sign contain nondisclosure agreements in addition to frank threats against their family and friends. And, elements of reality show casting are horrific enough to deserve a transparent discussion. Full of dangerous, dirty secrets no one can talk about the full details except me, an unlikely candidate from the start. The only explanation I have is that my interest was accelerated by a desire to please, an insensate understanding of pop culture and a pathological curiosity.

When my husband Billy and his daughter Lila moved in with me and my children in 2008, they brought with them a riot of pop culture we had never been exposed to. As I sorted through the novel offerings I understood two things almost immediately: I hated video games the most and liked cooking shows the best. We had watched “Hell’s Kitchen” for two years already when “MasterChef” began its run in 2010. Billy got me hooked in the first season. I dug into the sort of anxiety that resolves deliciously at the end of each season and enjoyed recreating and embellishing the food in my own kitchen. We watched season 2 but, really, I watched Billy watch the second season. He liked watching it, and I wanted to be the thing he liked watching.

Even with my limited knowledge of reality shows, I knew that real people became unreal characters. I’d long understood that the caveat to my lifelong atheism was that though there is no one creator god, all gods are real, because people create them through belief. Once made, gods take on their own power. It’s not just mental illness that causes a person to think a god voice has spoken to them. It’s also that the god has been brought into existence as a character with a measure of his or her own free will. Same with reality show contestant fame. Did I want my husband to see me on television as a kitchen goddess creature brought into existence for a moment? Yes, I did. I wanted to be more special than a person. That impulse alone is both questionable and problematic for a person weighing the odds of a dangerous decision. And I imagine it’s a feeling shared by most people wanting to be reality stars.

The casting process that no one is allowed to talk about occurs in multiple stages. Most contestants send a video, then go and prepare a “signature dish” in person at various tryouts around the country (I drove to Seattle to do mine), at which point the “signature dish” is graded by subcontracted cooking school judges in secret. If they pass you on, the next step is filling out reams of paperwork that end up coaxing a TV-ready backstory and a streamlined brand where, before, there was simply a person.

For other contestants, there is a different path. Quite a few of the “kooky” contestants, the ones with puppets and spells and flying falcons, are recruited, but for comic relief rather than a quick advance to the finals. They are Hollywood eccentric staples. Christine Ha, however, the winner of season 3, was recruited based on her Blind Chef cooking blog. Luca, winner of season 4, was recruited after an unsuccessful tryout with me in season 3. For me, this raised the question: Do they choose the winner before the first tryouts?

For us regular schlubs, once you pass the next few rounds of casting online, you get to fly to LA (which you pay for yourself). You gather with some of the other contestants in a nondescript meeting room at The Doubletree Hotel in Culver City and you all complete a two-hour-long personality psych test reminiscent of the somewhat outdated Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The test is analyzed by a computer while you wait and the results are then given to a psychiatrist who meets with each potential contestant. You do not get to see the results. It seemed to me that the point of the test is to judge what dramatic traits each person has that could be harvested later for a plot twist.

I filled out the questionnaire carefully, consistently, and not at all truthfully. “You’re a real rule follower, hmm?” asked the tall, fit examiner, who looked as if he could be a psychiatrist out of central casting himself. “I suppose so,” I answered blandly. I knew that tests with multiple similar questions asked in different ways are testing for lies. But, I think I beat it. The doctor figure asked a lot of other questions about mental health and what I guessed were follow-up questions for: hypochondriasis, hysteria, psychopathic deviation and hypomania, among other conditions. More generally, the test was an attempt to predict behavior in various situations. Or, what TV producers would call plotlines. Over the course of the 15-minute interview I peppered posed naïveté with sassy, authentic eye contact, thus maintaining the brand I had created without breaking character. Had he worked for other shows, I asked? My voice pitched higher than usual. “Yes!’” he said, “‘The Biggest Loser,’ ‘American Idol,’ all the Fox shows.”

I was too pissed at the thought of his sadistic prying into the vulnerable psyches of the idiots who would want to go on reality TV to maintain my “PNW Organic Mom 2.0” profile. “What about that First Do No Harm clause in your medical training?” I asked, my eyes narrowing now. I never imagined I would actually get to say that to a doctor in real life. I wanted to make him uncomfortable.

“We’re done here,” he said, opening the door. “Go see the private investigator now.”

The experience with the “MasterChef” detective felt just as invasive. No, I never modeled underwear for softcore porn. I don’t think? I’m sure I did many worse things he didn’t ask about, though, and I sweated guilt. He must have known I was guilty. I can’t remember what he looked like or how long I was in his office. Was I ever arrested? I don’t remember. What will the financial credit report, arrest records, residential history and historical reports he ordered dig up? Because I’ve done nothing. Right?

I flew back home to Portland, Oregon, the same day I left and felt wild, violated and alive. The blood and pee samples I had to send to them from the lab after I got home felt like no big deal after the professional interrogation. Submit. Submit your blood, they said. Yes, sir. I did.

I passed the next round of casting and they sent me the final multiple contracts by email and I sent them back 17 bulleted questions about the details because oh my god, they were unbelievable documents. Any part of myself that desired to please got trampled by the part that liked to win.

In the “MasterChef” contract, which a casting director later told me was essentially identical to those of most reality competition shows, they asked me to agree to be subjected to physical and mental distress, to agree to have my medical history used in any way that they wanted and to use it in perpetuity, to agree that my family would likely not be contacted in the case of an emergency. They asked me to release the show and its employees from liability for any injury to myself from risks both known and unknown. They asked that I release them from liability from the social and economic losses that could result and to please note that the consequences could be substantial and could permanently change the future for me, my family, friends and significant others.

They asked for a clause that could have kept me from working at my own media publicity company and to remove my own company website on their request.

They asked me to agree to pay a 15 percent “management fee” to a company called One Potato Two Potato (OPTP) owned by . . . Gordon Ramsay. This fee would then apply to any income or even gifts I received in any context potentially related to the show. I asked if OPTP would do any other career management. No, they said.

Despite the huge number of questions I asked, and despite the lawyers that they undoubtedly employed along with the detectives and psychiatrists, somehow someone missed that I never sent back the signed contract. I promised nothing.

The day before all the contestants arrived, the casting department called to say I had made the cut. I was a contestant. They were flying me out to LA the next day. Clearly, I was a replacement for someone else who dropped out at the last minute and I figured, fuck it. I never signed anything waiving any of my rights and as the daughter of a journalist, I’m genetically hardwired to be curious. It was the most perfect setup for a pathologically inquisitive, masochistic exhibitionist that ever was. I couldn’t wait to get there.

The contestant minders were called wranglers. They were all gorgeous. Perry was the lead wrangler but her official title was Contestant Coordinator. There were quite a few wranglers and in my memory they run together into one attractive, fit, amoral blur. All of the contestants stayed in a hotel for the first two days and, pelted with questions, the wranglers told us some things and would not tell us other things. It was hurry up and wait and whisper and guess. We spent all the time asking what was happening and where we were going and when we were eating. They got direction through earbuds which would then be transmitted to us.

There was an odd assembly where a producer (who appeared to be an actor) assured us that all the contestants had the same chance of winning or he would get in trouble with some official body and we should try our hardest. Then a member of the “official body” came on stage and shook his finger at the phony-looking producer and the producer pretended to be scared. It was like watching a psych version of WWF.

Everyone there besides me seemed like they were OK with believing whatever they were told. The contestants applauded and shrieked like initiates in a revival tent. Each one was a winner. They all just knew it. I was almost jealous. I missed out on the orgy of emotion and faith that the reality show congregants trampled over each other to prove.

We contestants were each interviewed during the first two days in front of a production set of fake produce, a regular horn of plenty, where I refused to be filmed holding the Walmart bag. We weren’t allowed out of the hotel room unless we were with the wranglers, who would take us on one or two outings, either to the hotel pool or a burger place, where we would share enormous confidences with one another. Explosive familiarity bloomed in these small portions of time we were able to see other people, strangers, who were all equally anxious to unfold their shininess to other shiny strangers after the stress of staying hours in a hotel room with antagonists and no phones. Because the wranglers made a huge deal out of telling us our roommate selections were random. And because that appeared impossible.

Everything the wranglers said seemed a pretty obvious setup to me to add intensity and create plotlines. I could see it from the outside (I kept a notebook, of course) and the artifice was fascinating and well done. From the inside it felt . . . gross. They had asked me about religion Atheist, I said. And food: all local and organic! So I was roomed with a devout Evangelical Christian woman who used sugar, Rice Krispies and food coloring to make statues of the judges’ heads, which she brought with her from Texas. The Palestinian and the Israeli were roomed together (the Israeli contestant dropped out before the end of the weekend). The short, anxious, possibly gay man and the bully banker. The flamboyant opera singer and the dead-eyed animal tracker. Contestants chosen for the producers’ raw accessibility to stereotyped plotlines. Locked in together for hours. Fascinating. Cruel. Effective. More than any other experience in my life, the wranglers exemplified the ideology of “just following orders.”

Once filming started we had 14-hour days on set while contestants took turns cooking, then either failed or made it through to the next round. Our clothing was assigned the first day and cleared with costume and we wore the same thing each day as the musky people smell increased and slept-in hairstyles were prodded back to center. As the people who didn’t get an apron left each day, the remaining contestants’ relationships grew more intense. The man with the puppets who read handwriting samples, the pastor’s wife from Detroit, the witch who tried to put a spell on the judges and the vegan bread maker who was shocked (shocked!) to hear that yeast was alive left fairly quickly. The Jamaican Marine cooking peas and rice the Italian cook who came back to win season 4 the gentle Hawaiian man whose parents promised to kill me a pig the fabulous, black, Christian opera singer the racist, alcoholic redneck, they mostly stayed till the end of the week.

The shiniest people were obvious from the beginning. The star power of Felix Fang, the technique and focus of Becky Reams, the staggering capability of blind contestant Christine Ha and the hugely tall, kind, food lover and former Army Corps of Engineers contract specialist Josh Marks outshined the rest of us, as we all stretched our powers of charisma.

My tryout was at the last part of the last day of the weeklong tryouts. The only people left were the ones who were continuing along to the next episode and the set was quieter than the days before. My dad (the journalist), my husband, my brother and his wife (pop culture enthusiasts), our three kids and my brother’s daughter flew down to California to watch while I cooked.

That morning, I left my wallet in the hotel room and future finalist Josh Marks noticed I was desperate for some coffee. “I got it!” he said. I blushed. I hate accepting things from people I don’t know well. “I’ll get you back when you’re famous,” I said. As if I didn’t care. “Absolutely,” he answered cheerfully. But I didn’t get the chance to buy Josh Marks a cup of coffee. No one has been able to do that for several years now.

On set through the day, the pressure mounted. I am not generally fazed by strangers trying to stress me out, but the wranglers and interviewers are pros. They also try out for the job that they have and the skill is being able to set people off balance. When contestants talk into the camera in a reality show, they are answering questions that have been carefully and tactically worded to create an interestingly uncomfortable moment. I was surprised to find myself flustered. I burned the goddamn garlic. Why did I decide to use a Japanese mandolin when I had never used one before? Because I wanted to know how it worked just like I wanted to know how a reality TV show worked. But, it turns out solving puzzles with a clock running down while people try to destabilize you is less satisfying on set than in real life.

Like the scene from “The Wizard of Oz,” I walked slowly past the crowd pushing a cart with my signature dish on in through the black curtain darkness with all of the videographers and wranglers dressed in black, motionless, watching me and suddenly: there I was in a cavernous room. Gordon Ramsay, Graham Elliot and Joe Bastianich were elevated on a stage in front of me, brightly lit god-men.

They each asked me about the dish (it’s an egg frittata with California asparagus and goat butter Hollandaise! All sourced within five miles of the warehouse and all organic!). Branding myself as “Portland Locavore” was a no-brainer. They each walked down from the stage one at a time and tasted then, an airplane flew over the warehouse. “Damn, that ruined the ambience,” said Graham. I started cracking up. “OK, again,” said one of the interviewers. I regained my lack of awe.

“Beauty shot,” said the cameraman. “We want to take a long still of your plate.” I backed off obediently and then realized they were filming me, not the plate. That was how they got those odd shots of people nervously waiting right before a commercial break. I stared back at the camera, eyes as flat as possible. Fuck. No.

“No,” said Joe. “Yes,” said Graham. Then I remembered — they had already interviewed me about this — “which judge’s 'yes' vote would be most important and emotional for you?” I had told them, well, Graham will say yes, Joe will say no, so Gordon’s the swing vote. Which is how they wrote it. So that I would react.

I knew I wouldn’t get an apron because I was a replacement contestant from the start, plus I wouldn’t hold the Walmart bag. As I watched during the week, I learned that the food had little to do with moving past the first round. The tryout round was to watch contestants for telegenic qualities, one-liners and quick responses on camera and potential plotlines between contestants. The second round knocked out all of the contestants who had compelling, touching backstories but not much cooking experience and/or not enough plotline potential.

“Daaamn. Shame,” Gordon said in his thick British accent. He didn’t like my frittata (burned garlic). “But the goat butter Hollan-dez is rally qu-white good.”

“Thanks!!” I couldn’t help being excited by the verbal pat on the head. I knew that on top of the other egregious actions sustained by the “MasterChef” contestants, Gordon’s management company was waiting to siphon off future earnings from winners. But he was awfully charismatic in person. I think it was season 3 winner Christine Ha who said he smells incredible. I didn’t get close enough and I wasn’t going to be one of those people who asked for a hug in the first round.

There was a dramatic pause in which I felt zero anxiety. “No,” he said. Because I knew he would. I can’t deny a bit of disappointment, though, as much as I would like to. So I didn’t win at not caring entirely, but I gave it my all.

I walked back through the door with no apron and everyone made sad sounds for the camera. I looked at my husband — let’s get the fuck out of here. “Stop. Exit interviews,” said the wrangler.

She wasn’t the wrangler I had been led around by all week and she wasn’t Perry, queen of the wranglers, but she was enough of a voice of authority that I stopped rather than diving through the open door like I wanted to. It might have been Carter. Or Angelic. It’s possible this next part is a stress memory, but I’m nearly certain that the exit interview took place in an elevated boxing ring. Although there’s no good reason there would be a boxing ring in the warehouse. Maybe the ring was there so I wouldn’t contaminate the winners with failure. Losers were very strictly not allowed to speak with other contestants. Once you failed, you no longer belonged.

I rushed through the interview quickly and was so close to the industrial backdoor when another gorgeous anonymous wrangler told me I had to see the psychiatrist again. No, not the same doctor. “Do you harbor any thoughts of killing any of the judges or yourself?” he asked. “No . . . .” said I. They finally let me go.

When I got home I was a little screwed up. Despite knowing that they were messing with me, it worked, probably because I thought I was immune. Anxious, neurotic, easily startled and sobbing off and on for the next week, I was mortified that I could have inadvertently exposed my children to a bout of my depression (self-imposed, no less). I hid as much as possible and it passed in a week or so. The children steadfastly pretended not to notice.

I learned later from speaking with a number of the runner-up cooks that every round longer that a contestant stayed in the competition, the symptoms of traumatic stress appeared more intense when they returned home. Many of the runners-up from each season appear quite damaged. Some are unable to hold jobs, have difficulties with explosive anger. The winners fare somewhat better but not always. I’m still friends with many of them on Facebook and there are secret Facebook groups to talk about all things reality, though interest for most contestants dies off over the years other than blatant self-promotion, fundraising and talk of appearances on other cooking shows.

Despite thinking most of the people who decided to sign that contract were total rubes, the contestants of season 3 were some of the most interesting people I ever met and I don’t doubt that they all had their own reasons for submitting to the abuse. It was a group formed by a casting department for intentionally created, attractive diversity: telegenic people from as many walks of life as they could come up with, who would do practically anything for attention and who loved food. I wouldn’t have traded that part of the experience. But it’s impossible to discuss the experience of being a short-term reality show contestant without noting that some don't emerge from the experience unscathed.

The week the season finished filming, after he lost the finale to Christine Ha, Josh Marks, the self-titled “gentle giant,” was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. He struggled with psychosis. Josh got into several conflicts, including a fight with cops, and heard voices in his head. Police said he claimed he had been possessed by Ramsay. It’s not hard to imagine the god that Gordon Ramsay became through Josh’s deep faith actually manifested. The week before he took his life, Josh was diagnosed with schizophrenia. I met this man’s family. I met his mother, who struggled to find adequate mental health resources for him in Chicago. Josh was kind and decent and excited about his future and starting a restaurant on Martha’s Vineyard and I mourned his death.

All three of our kids told me that reality TV was stupid and that on-set filming was boring. I think they were still annoyed that I tried to leave them for a month. My husband and I never really watched cooking shows again until the “Great British Bake Off” years later. I felt bad about it in a topical way — we had to start watching something else, so thank god for “True Blood.”

An activity I thought would be partially a lark and partially an unprofessional investigation became something else: an experiment in power and submission and subversion over which I had no control. I knew there would be danger, but I thought the danger would give me energy, that it would excite me creatively where a happy marriage and a calm few years had left me feeling dull and soft without the potential for danger. But instead of feeling like a warrior surviving a crucible, I left feeling I had failed to protect the tender people. Eccentric, charismatic strangers, yes, but these fragile egotists couldn’t have completely known the results of professional abuse. Being violated is something that can make people feel alive. But that doesn’t make it safe.

A month after I returned home I got a chatty note from the casting director. “Oh, could you send me those final forms, it seems we don’t have your signed contract.”

“I'm really not at all wild about that idea,” I wrote back.

More forcefully she wrote back: “I’m having legal call you to straighten this out.”


Watch the video: Master Chef contestant Krissi gives attitude to judges after bad dish


Previous Article

Everything to Know About the Kegged Cocktail Trend

Next Article

Tomato sauce for pasta or pizza