Eatzi's expands into two new locations



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Eatzi’s Market & Bakery will be opening a third store in the Dallas suburb of Grapevine, Texas, in May and on Tuesday signed a lease for a fourth unit in Plano, Texas.

The culinary retail concept, which debuted to much fanfare in 1996 for its innovations in take-home meals, will debut the new Grapevine store on May 17. The market-bakery will occupy 10,000 square feet of freestanding retail and foodservice space in a former Luby’s Cafeteria site, and will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Eatzi’s chief executive, Adam Romo, said in a phone interview Tuesday that the Plano store will be newly constructed in a 10,000-square-foot space in an upscale mixed-use center that's currently under development at Parker Road and the Dallas North Tollway.

“We’ll be the retail anchor for the high-end apartments/condos and office space,” Romo said. “We’ll be the first business there.” He added that the center will also include some higher-end casual-dining restaurants.

The Grapevine opening will offer limited seating, similar to the two existing locations, and put emphasis on its “Meals for the Taking” motto. Romo, who was a member of the management team that opened the original Eatzi’s in 1996 and was hired as CEO last year, said the new Grapevine and Plano stores will offer selections similar to the two existing locations.

The market-bakery will offer more than 1,500 items and feature a full bakery for 200 varieties of artisan breads and pastries. The Grapevine unit will also carry 130 deli meats and cheeses, prepared salads and sandwiches and complete meals to go.

“We’ve evolved the menu over the years for current trends and tastes,” Romo said.

Eatzi’s is currently owned by its original creator, Dallas-based restaurant impresario Phil Romano, who also pioneered the Fuddrucker’s and Macaroni Grill concepts. In order to "keep the integrity of his creation," according to the company, Romano bought back Eatzi’s after it expanded nationwide, with an investment by Brinker International. He eventually shut down seven operations in Atlanta, New York and Houston, only to leave the original Dallas location standing.

The company began to expand again in 2009 with the opening of a second unit in Dallas, and is continuing its growth with its new Grapevine and Plano locations.

“It’s the exact same excitement and anticipation and feeling of growing the business as back then," said Romo, who served as chief financial officer for the original Eatzi’s push. "It’s almost like experiencing the resurgence of a whole new concept.”

Romo added that real estate developers from around the country are “inundating” him with proposed locations. “It’s much like it was back in the ‘90s,” he said. “A lot of people are familiar with the brand. When they hear we’re growing, they are asking us to consider their locations.”

However, Romo said the company plans to keep Eatzi’s in Texas for the time being.

“We really understand the industry now…and how we fit into peoples' lifestyles for convenience,” Romo said. “I won’t make the same mistakes that we made with trial and error. We’re confident in our strategy.”

EARLIER: Previous: Eatzi's poised for growth again

Contact Ron Ruggless at [email protected]
Follow him on Twitter: @RonRuggless


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


Creating, Concatenating, and Expanding Matrices

The most basic MATLAB® data structure is the matrix. A matrix is a two-dimensional, rectangular array of data elements arranged in rows and columns. The elements can be numbers, logical values ( true or false ), dates and times, strings, or some other MATLAB data type.

Even a single number is stored as a matrix. For example, a variable containing the value 100 is stored as a 1-by-1 matrix of type double .

Constructing a Matrix of Data

If you have a specific set of data, you can arrange the elements in a matrix using square brackets. A single row of data has spaces or commas in between the elements, and a semicolon separates the rows. For example, create a single row of four numeric elements. The size of the resulting matrix is 1-by-4, since it has one row and four columns. A matrix of this shape is often referred to as a row vector.

Now create a matrix with the same numbers, but arrange them in two rows. This matrix has two rows and two columns.

Specialized Matrix Functions

MATLAB has many functions that help create matrices with certain values or a particular structure. For example, the zeros and ones functions create matrices of all zeros or all ones. The first and second arguments of these functions are the number of rows and number of columns of the matrix, respectively.

The diag function places the input elements on the diagonal of a matrix. For example, create a row vector A containing four elements. Then, create a 4-by-4 matrix whose diagonal elements are the elements of A .

Concatenating Matrices

You can also use square brackets to join existing matrices together. This way of creating a matrix is called concatenation . For example, concatenate two row vectors to make an even longer row vector.

To arrange A and B as two rows of a matrix, use the semicolon.

To concatenate two matrices, they must have compatible sizes. In other words, when you concatenate matrices horizontally, they must have the same number of rows. When you concatenate them vertically, they must have the same number of columns. For example, horizontally concatenate two matrices that both have two rows.

An alternative way to concatenate matrices is to use concatenation functions such as horzcat , which horizontally concatenates two compatible input matrices.

Generating a Numeric Sequence

The colon is a handy way to create matrices whose elements are sequential and evenly spaced. For example, create a row vector whose elements are the integers from 1 to 10.

You can use the colon operator to create a sequence of numbers within any range, incremented by one.

To change the value of the sequence increment, specify the increment value in between the starting and ending range values, separated by colons.

To decrement, use a negative number.

You can also increment by noninteger values. If an increment value does not evenly partition the specified range, MATLAB automatically ends the sequence at the last value it can reach before exceeding the range.

Expanding a Matrix

You can add one or more elements to a matrix by placing them outside of the existing row and column index boundaries. MATLAB automatically pads the matrix with zeros to keep it rectangular. For example, create a 2-by-3 matrix and add an additional row and column to it by inserting an element in the (3,4) position.

You can also expand the size by inserting a new matrix outside of the existing index ranges.

To expand the size of a matrix repeatedly, such as within a for loop, it's usually best to preallocate space for the largest matrix you anticipate creating. Without preallocation, MATLAB has to allocate memory every time the size increases, slowing down operations. For example, preallocate a matrix that holds up to 10,000 rows and 10,000 columns by initializing its elements to zero.

If you need to preallocate additional elements later, you can expand it by assigning outside of the matrix index ranges or concatenate another preallocated matrix to A .

Empty Arrays

An empty array in MATLAB is an array with at least one dimension length equal to zero. Empty arrays are useful for representing the concept of "nothing" programmatically. For example, suppose you want to find all elements of a vector that are less than 0, but there are none. The find function returns an empty vector of indices, indicating that it couldn't find any elements less than 0.

Many algorithms contain function calls that can return empty arrays. It is often useful to allow empty arrays to flow through these algorithms as function arguments instead of handling them as a special case. If you do need to customize empty array handling, you can check for them using the isempty function.


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