Britain Is Binge Drinking Like Crazy



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Apparently, binge drinking is getting so big in Britain, the government has dedicated 'booze buses' and clinics for those who drank too much.

Well this is sort of bleak news for a Monday: Apparently, binge drinking has gotten so bad in Britain, there are designated clinics specifically for those who had one too many, to keep them off the streets and out of emergency rooms.

The Associated Press reports that while overall alcohol consumption levels have decreased in Britain since the mid-2000s, binge-drinking is pervading the bar culture, and liver disease has increased 25 percent in the last decade.

Furthermore, the National Health service reportedly spends $4.4 billion a year on binge-drinking related costs, including hospital admissions for alcohol-induced violence and other health problems.

Ambulences have since been dubbed "booze buses," as they bring the wasted to clinics to sober up, a government service meant to keep drunk people out of emergency rooms and out of trouble. Naturally, to curb binge drinking the government is discussing a minimum alcohol price per unit, à la Scotland's recent price increase.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


The NHS defines binge drinking as “drinking lots of alcohol in a short space of time or drinking to get drunk”. 1

Because everybody is different, it is not easy to say exactly how many units in one session count as binge drinking. The definition used by the Office of National Statistics for binge drinking is having over 8 units in a single session for men and over 6 units for women. 2

Of course, people may drink at different speeds or drink over a different amount of time and this definition may not apply to everyone.

What we can say is that the risks of short-term harms like accidents or injuries increase between two to five times from drinking 5-7 units. 3 This is equivalent to 2-3 pints of beer.

The sorts of things more likely to happen when people drink too much or too quickly on a single occasion include accidents resulting in injury, misjudging risky situations or losing self-control.


Watch the video: No Joke: The Truth About Alcoholism


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